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L&C Graduate Finds Opportunity in Medical Assisting

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Article by: Paige Allen, pallen@lc.edu
GODFREY – For Blake Raynor, Lewis and Clark Community College’s Medical Assisting program was a good first step on his path to becoming a registered nurse.

It was also a step that lead him to getting a job in his field, where he is gaining valuable experience sooner than some of his peers.

Raynor, 22, of Gillespie, recently participated in the college’s largest ever Commencement ceremony, May 18 in the Hatheway Cultural Center’s Ann Whitney Olin Theatre. Before that, he completed L&C’s Medical Assisting program in the fall and has been working for BJC Medical Group of Missouri ever since.

“Within a few weeks of finishing the program I was able to get a job in the field, and I really enjoy what I do,” Raynor said. “My goal is to continue working for BJC and get tuition reimbursement so I can go back to school to become a nurse.”

Medical assistants are multi-skilled health professionals specifically educated to work as a member of a healthcare team, performing a broad range of clinical and administrative tasks under the supervision of a physician, physician’s assistant or nurse practitioner.

Program graduates assist healthcare professionals in many aspects of medical and nursing practice, including patient care management, administrative and clinical procedures. Students learn about the administrative duties of scheduling and receiving patients, preparing and maintaining medical records, performing basic secretarial skills, handling telephone calls, writing correspondence, serving as the liaison between the physician and other individuals, and managing practice finances. 

Program coordinator Shelle Ridings said Raynor was a dedicated student who has a bright future in the medical field.

“I admired Blake for his ability to adapt to situations quickly and support the success of his fellow classmates,” Ridings said. “He is very dedicated, not only to his own success, but to everyone around him. This type of attitude benefitted Blake as a student and will continue to benefit him in his career.”

Raynor said medical assisting is a good choice for students who want to join the medical field and aren’t sure where to start.

“The program gives you the knowledge and confidence so you are ready to work in healthcare immediately upon finishing the program,” he said. “It also helps prepare you to further your education if you wish.”

For more information on Lewis and Clark’s Medical Assisting program, contact Ridings by calling (618) 468-4616 or via email sridings@lc.edu.