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  • ENG 132

    Jeremy Griggs

    FENCES by August Wilson

    Disclaimer: The sources that follow are meant to help get you started in your research and are not all-inclusive. As a result, you will need to do further independent research on whatever direction you pursue. Please feel free to contact Liz (lburns@lc.edu) or Greg (gcash@lc.edu) in the library for help.

    Note: To access the articles below, you will need your 14-digit library ID number if you are off-campus. This number is on the back of your L&C photo ID card as well as in your Blazernet profile, or contact the library during normal business hours to find out what yours is. 

    AUDIO-VISUAL

    ARTICLES

    Books on Reserve in the Library - 2-hour in-house use only.

    Note: You are welcome to make photocopies of the pages you need or take pictures using your phone.

    • Bogumil, Mary L. Understanding August Wilson. University of South Carolina Press, 1999.
    • Clark, Keith. Black Manhood in James Baldwin, Ernest J. Gaines, and August Wilson. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002.
    • Shannon, Sandra Garrett. August Wilson’s Fences: A Reference Guide. Greenwood Press, 2003.
    • Wilson, August. The Ground on Which I Stand. Theatre Communications Group, 2001.

    For further research, we recommend trying the following databases (www.lc.edu/Article_Databases):

    • Academic Search Complete
    • American History Online Streaming Video Collection
    • Credo Reference Library
    • Education Online Streaming Video Collection
    • Education Research Complete
    • History Reference Center
    • Newspaper Source
    • Salem Press Collection – Critical Insights: The American Dream
    • Salem Press Collection: Civil Disobedience, Social Justice, Nationalism & Populism, Violent Demonstrations, and Race Relations
    • Salem Press Collection: Defining Documents in American History – The 1960s